Monthly Archives

July 2013

505 Class New Boom Design

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At CST, we aim to constantly improve the function of our products. This includes strength, lightness, stiffness but also ease of use and aesthetics. The latest 505 boom to leave our factory features improvements in every single category.

In order to gain extra stiffness of the boom without adding weight, we used High Modulus carbon fibre as opposed to Intermediate Modulus.

In addition, constant improvements in sail design require stiffer booms and more refined fittings. To complement the stiffer tube, CST has upgraded the various fittings to include a Ronstan snap shackle laminated directly onto the boom. Not only does this make for easy attachment of the vang cascade, but it eliminates the need for holes to be drilled in the boom as this compromises the structural integrity.

MG14 boom with lightweight twin poles and laminated vang snap shackle

505 boom with lightweight twin poles and laminated vang snap shackle

The vang is not the only fitting attached directly onto the boom, as the mainsheet hangers are also a standard carbon fitting that is glued in place. These sleek fittings have been methodically tested and have been proved to withstand up to 1200kg and in some cases, the 3/16 solid stainless steel pin sheared under the pressure before the carbon broke!

MG14 laminated glue-on mainsheet hanger. can be fitted to both mid-boom and end

505 glue-on mainsheet hanger. Can be fitted to both mid and end boom sheeting.

Finally, the gooseneck slot is a moulded fitting that is glued into place, bonding directly to the boom with 100% surface area contact, spreading the load evenly. These gooseneck fittings are a stock part and can be purchased separately from our CST stock.

MG14 glue-on stock gooseneck

505 glue-on stock gooseneck

High Modulus carbon, laminated vang snap shackle, glue-on mainsheet hangers and moulded carbon glue-on gooseneck fittings. No holes are drilled. No compromise in strength. Practical, functional and bulletproof fittings. Gorgeous looks from every angle.

The new 505 boom from CST Composites will make you the envy of the entire rigging park.

Boom Flex Analysis

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Sailing is a sport with many variables. This means that there is always something to improve on to make your boat point higher, go faster, or both. Since it is not possible to control them all, we strive to research and discover where the next improvement should be made in order to achieve the greatest gain.

The Moth class has come along way in recent years. Now that the boats are up and foiling, a speed differential as drammatic as was gained by the hydrofoil is no longer on the horizon. As a result, smaller improvements over many areas are the name of the game.

Fast-forward to today and through our constant analysis of the class, we have found that the next big speed gain will come from taming and controlling the aerodynamics of the sail. And from that, boom stiffness is the next critical step. Australian Olympic Coach Emmett Lazich says the following on the topic:

“Stiff booms are important in most classes, and they are critical for the Moth class. With mid boom sheeting and a narrow angle for the vang direction of pull, the Moth boom gets a serious work out.

“There is no debate that boom flex hurts performance. When the boom flex’s in any direction in a gust, the unsupported mainsail foot deepens just when we’d prefer it to flatten. But the problem with boom flex is far worse than just controlling the foot depth. In a gust we want automatic flattening and twisting of the mainsail (progressive fanning) from the head down, and mast bend is a primary tool for achieving this. There is always a time lag before the mast will bend in response to a gust. The mainsail air pressure changes increase loads on the mast and boom, and if the boom bends to easily, that means the mast will bend later. Delayed mast response will require excess trimming, steering and control line adjustments, and since there is no such thing as a steady wind for a Moth, top speed will be less.”

Emmett’s words become critical when the conditions are marginal for foiling. The speed differential between being up on the foils or wallowing in the water are crystal clear. When in low wind-speed, often a small body pump is needed to encourage the boat to foil. That pump is when the leech and foot need to remain bar taut, and any boom flex reduces the efficiency of this pump by huge amounts. This moment is that all too critical point to overcome in order to launch your boat onto the foils.

Following Emmett’s intuition, we conducted our own empirical research on the various types of booms currently in use in the Moth fleet. We found that our newest booms are by far the stiffest in both horizontal and vertical planes, as can be seen below.

Vertical Deflection

Vertical Deflection

Sideways Deflection

Sideways Deflection

At CST Composites we are constantly researching and developing in order to continue being market leaders in bringing the fastest technology and gear to you at the best price. Stay tuned for more exciting developments to our product range.

Testing booms on our high-tech Instron machine

Testing booms on our high-tech Instron machine

Andrew Cuddihy, 18′ Skiff Legend has one of our new booms and these are his thoughts here.

Level Playing Field for International Moth Sailors

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If you have been interested in the Moth class recently, or have had any contact with it, you will surely notice how many boats are using a mast and/or boom from CST Composites. Not only that, but the sail numbers attached to these masts and booms come from countries all over the world such as Spain, America, New Zealand, Estonia, France, United Kingdom and many others!

Since all our products are made proudly in Australia, shipping costs to these overseas customers is a constant concern. In order to ensure that the costs remain a low as possible, we have been supplying our masts in either one or two pieces. Conducive to keeping our overseas customers competitive, we have just finalised some upgrades to our Elite 4 and Elite 11 two piece masts!

Upgrades to Elite 4 and Elite 11 masts

Upgrades to Elite 4 and Elite 11 masts

These masts feature new patching on the tip, the join and the base in order to save weight, bringing the overall mass down to 2.16kg. The light weight does not have a negative impact on performance as the bend characteristics remain constant; making these masts the perfect fit for MSL16, North and Hyde sails.

Additionally, we are aware that different wind conditions require different sails and therefore, different bend properties. This means that those who are keen to get the best out of their boat in all conditions have more than one mast. This has presented a problem in the past with multiple mast tips and bases being mistaken and mixed up, often producing negative effects. With regard to this, all our two part masts will now have barcodes printed on both the tip and the base, making it easier to identify which tip belongs to which base.

Two part moth mast with barcode identifiers

Two part moth mast with barcode identifiers

Another advantage of this is if you wish to experiment with different bend properties and sail shapes in various wind conditions, you can make accurate decisions as to which tip to mix with which base, and it is now possible to record the results of how each tip performed with each base.

In the interests of the customer, CST Composites are always looking to reduce shipping costs whilst not hampering performance. This means that all our customers, regardless of what flag you sail under, can have the same opportunities and the same gear as past champions! Equality, efficiency economy. CST Composites are looking after you.

Update to Contender boom

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CST Composites are constantly researching new ways to help boats go faster. One recent advancement is the new boom we produce for the International Contender class.

Contender with CST boom and mast

Contender with CST boom and mast

The most obvious improvement is the change in shape from elliptical to rectangular. The primary reason for this is the vast increase in stiffness the new shape affords.

There are multiple other advantages to the new design. For example, the new booms come already fitted with mainsheet hangers and laminated vang fittings. When load-tested, the easy to install, glue-on mainsheet hangers withstood over 1000kg. The change to laminated vang fittings follows the trend with our other small boat racing products.

Glue on mainsheet hanger

Glue on mainsheet hanger

The new boom comes with a lightweight, low-friction thimble laminated securely on which reduces weight, eliminates moving parts and invalidates the need for holes to be drilled into the boom which weaken the section.

Low-friction ring laminated on

Low-friction ring laminated on

The new rectangular shape with its flat surfaces also makes it easier to attach other fittings and makes it easier to stow for travel, taking up less space than its rounder counterparts. Not to mention, the new boom won’t roll away when rigging on a slope!

Overall, the new design follows the successful trend of our Moth and 18′ skiff booms and now brings those benefits to the Contender class.

Be sure to place your order!

Drastic Improvements for Sayer 44 Boom

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Recently, CST Composites received a request to replace a broken alloy boom for a Sayer 44. The client wanted to replace the boom with a composite section, whilst keeping the expensive end-fittings. In addition, as with all our clients, cutting down on costs, reducing weight and quick turnaround time were paramount.

In response to this task, CST Composites altered a mandrel so that whilst the boom section would be oval, the rectangular ends required for the existing fittings would be wound as one section. This drastically improves the integrity of the boom as the entire section is produced as a single piece.

Elliptical to rectangular in a single section

Elliptical to rectangular in a single section

In addition, the production was engineered to allow the entire product to be supplied in kit form with easy-to-attach fittings. This shortens the production time, cutting labour costs and ensuring quick turnaround time.

Fittings are easy to attach and look sleek

Fittings are easy to attach and look sleek

Couple these factors with the obvious weight benefits of replacing the 50kg alloy section with a section that only weighs 30kg yet is 20% stiffer due to the use of our Intermediate Modulus fibre, not to mention the impressive aesthetic appeal, and the overall result is a success on every front.

This is just another example of how CST Composites works with the customer to identify problems and engineer a solution that is stronger, lighter, longer lasting, better looking and less expensive than alternative products.

2013 18′ Skiff European Championships

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The European Championships for the 18′ skiff class came up all CST this year with Howard Hamlin steering the CST boat to a dominating lead, winning the regatta with 2 races to spare. Howie attributes the performance not only to his crew of Scott Babbage and Pete Harris, but to the gear he has on the boat.

CST Composites has worked with Howie to develop a new rig layout for his skiff, combined with his wardrobe of Glaser sails, to achieve superiority over the fleet at this international regatta.

Howard explains: “Basically my goal is still the same.  Have even mast bend where the vang only affects leech control and cunningham is used to flatten evenly top to bottom.

2013 18' Skiff European Championships

2013 18′ Skiff European Championships

“The rig and sails look great, it is all about learning how to use them.  We still have a lot of untapped potential left.  We are at a huge disadvantage without anyone in America to race or tune against.  So we only get to work on it when racing 3 times a year (Sydney, Europeans and San Francisco).

“It has been really nice to do this project with CST and Glaser.  I now have a much better understanding of how skiff rigs/sails behave and what we need to do.”

Howies new rig layout differed from the fleet through the fore stay and side stay points both moving up the tip, close to a meter higher than the conventional rig layout. This helped achieve the more even and symmetrical bend that skiff-sailors and sail-makers covet. In addition, the higher fore stay means the fore-triangle increases in size, in turn, increasing the size of the jib. This change is important as it closes the gap between the size of the mainsail versus the size of the jib, resulting in a better balance of the two sails and improved dynamics.

New CST rig with higher fore stay

New CST rig with higher fore stay

Perhaps this will be the catalyst needed to entice more American sailors to participate in the 18′ skiff class. CST Composites continues to support the growth, development and ingenuity of this iconic class.